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Typus
KomplettPlagiat
Bearbeiter
Graf Isolan
Gesichtet
Yes
Untersuchte Arbeit:
Seite: 70, Zeilen: 9-30
Quelle: Zafar 2003
Seite(n): 1 (Internetversion), Zeilen: -
Over the last decade agricultural and rural populations in the developing world have become more extensively and directly affected by several new processes in a rapidly changing global context. Rural populations are being confronted with more dynamic and, therefore, less predictable market-dominated conditions of production. Recent studies have shown that more varied employment becomes available as workers move out of agriculture and subsistence production and into paid employment in the expanding manufacturing and service sectors (Mehra and Gammage, 1999). However, this trend does not necessarily reflect healthy growth in the agricultural sector. A slightly increasing feminization of the agricultural labour force in most developing countries may reflect the fact that women are lagging behind men and abandoning agriculture at a slower rate (Mehra and Gammage, 1999). Furthermore, women tend to work in low-productivity jobs more often than men, especially those who remain in the agricultural sector.

It is unfortunate that individuals apparently similar with respect to productivity receive widely different earnings on the basis of non-economic criteria like sex, which raises serious questions of equity, efficiency and human rights. Labour market conditions are usually unfavourable for the female labour force (FLF) in many developing countries like Pakistan. Conditions in high paying professions are usually not favourable for women as they are mostly absorbed in traditional sectors like agriculture and low paid occupations pertaining to petty services. Their contribution towards economic development is not duly acknowledged and moreover accurate data pertaining to FLF and their economic contribution is not available in developing countries.


Mehra, R. / Gammage, S., 1999: Trends, countertrends, and gaps in women’s employment, World Development, 27, 3: 535-550.

Over the last decade agricultural and rural populations in the developing world have become more extensively and directly affected by several new processes in a rapidly changing global context. [...] Rural populations are being confronted with more dynamic and, therefore, less predictable market-dominated conditions of production. [...]

[...]

Recent studies have shown that more varied employment becomes available as workers move out of agriculture and subsistence production and into paid employment in the expanding manufacturing and service sectors (Mehra and Gammage, 1999). However, this trend does not necessarily reflect healthy growth in the agricultural sector. [...]

[...] A slightly increasing feminization of the agricultural labour force in most developing countries may reflect the fact that women are lagging behind men and abandoning agriculture at a slower rate (Mehra and Gammage, 1999). Furthermore, women tend to work in low-productivity jobs more often than men, especially those who remain in the agricultural sector.

[...] It is unfortunate that individuals apparently similar with respect to productivity, receive widely different earnings on the basis of non-economic criteria like sex, which raises serious questions of equity, efficiency and human rights.

Labour market conditions are usually unfavourable for the female labour force (FLF) in many developing countries. Conditions in high paying professions are usually not favourable for women as they are mostly absorbed in traditional sectors like agriculture and low paid occupations pertaining to petty services. Their contribution towards economic development is not duly acknowledged and moreover accurate data pertaining to FLF and their economic contribution is not available in developing countries.

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Sichter
(Graf Isolan), SleepyHollow02
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