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This perspective recognises that given the dynamic character of communities, they are unlikely to return to a pre-existing state, but will transform in an adaptive way to external change.

The transformation view of resilience is particularly useful for understanding how a community can respond positively to change. It accepts that change is inevitable, rather than seeing change as a ‘stressor’ from which a community needs to recover to its original state. The view of resilience as transformation embraces the dynamic character of communities and human-ecosystem interactions and sees multiple potential pathways within them. Deterministic views of resilience which see resilience as a community simply returning to a pre-existing state are unable to incorporate this complexity. Viewing resilience as transformation also draws the focus to the adaptive capacities of a community – the characteristics which enable it to develop and innovate in response to a change – rather than its vulnerabilities. It is here that the difference between social resilience and ecological resilience becomes clear. Social resilience recognises the powerful capacity of people to learn from their experiences and to consciously incorporate this learning into their interactions with the social and physical environment. This view of resilience is important for the hypothesis of this thesis, because it acknowledges that people themselves are able to shape the ‘trajectory of change’ and play a central role in the degree and type of impact caused by the change.

This perspective recognises that given the dynamic character of communities, they are unlikely to return to a pre-existing state, but will transform in an adaptive way to external change.

The transformation view of resilience is particularly useful for understanding how a community can respond positively to change. It accepts that change is inevitable, rather than seeing change as a ‘stressor’ from which a community needs to recover to its original state. The view of resilience as transformation embraces the dynamic character of communities and human-ecosystem interactions and sees multiple potential pathways within them. Deterministic views of resilience which see resilience as a community simply returning to a pre-existing state are unable to incorporate this complexity. Viewing resilience as transformation also draws the focus to the adaptive capacities of a community – the characteristics which enable it to develop and innovate in response to a change – rather than its vulnerabilities. It is here that the difference between social resilience and ecological resilience becomes clear. Social resilience recognises the powerful capacity of people to learn from their experiences and to consciously incorporate this learning into their interactions with the social and physical environment. This view of resilience is important because it acknowledges that people themselves are able to shape the ‘trajectory of change’ (Herreria et al. 2006) and play a central role in the degree and type of impact caused by the change.


Herreria E, Byron I, Kancans R & Stenekes N (2006) Assessing dependence on water for agriculture and social resilience. Canberra: Bureau of Rural Sciences.

Anmerkungen

The source for this text parallel is not given, although it supposedly is the basis for the hypothesis of this thesis.

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