Assessing the Impact of XML/EDI with Real Option Valuation

von Dr. Shermin Voshmgir

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[1.] Svr/Fragment 016 02 - Diskussion
Zuletzt bearbeitet: 2020-02-14 11:59:21 [[Benutzer:|]]
BauernOpfer, Berners-Lee et al 2001, Fragment, Gesichtet, SMWFragment, Schutzlevel sysop, Svr

Typus
BauernOpfer
Bearbeiter
SleepyHollow02
Gesichtet
Yes.png
Untersuchte Arbeit:
Seite: 16, Zeilen: 2-10, 15-17, 20-23, 25-32
Quelle: Berners-Lee et al 2001
Seite(n): 36, Zeilen: 36: right col., 15 ff.; 37: left col., 1 ff. center col., 9 ff., right col., 1 ff. ; 38: left col., 1 ff., right col., 3 ff.
[The Idea of XML is to support the vision of the Semantic Web,] to bring structure to the meaningful content of Web pages, creating an environment where software agents roaming from page to page can read ly carry out sophisticated tasks for users.

2. The Semantic Web

It has been discussed that most of the content on the Internet is designed for humans to read, not for computer programs to manipulate meaningfully. Computers can parse Web pages for layout and routine processing (headers, links, meta-tags), but in general computers have no reliable way to process the semantics. [...]

The challenge of the semantic web is to provide a language that expresses both data and rules for reasoning about the data and that allows rules from any existing knowledge-representation system to be exported onto the Web. [In the world of the semantic web a tourist can connect to the Internet via his handheld device and enter certain keywords when looking for a restaurant. A software agent searching the web will find the information of a list of restaurant [sic] containing] keywords such as <dinner>, <lunch>, <restaurant>, <Italian> (as might be encoded today) but also that the <opening-hours> at this restaurant are <weekdays> and then the script takes a <time range> in <yyyy-mm-dd-hour> format and returns <table available>, [thus automatically booking a table when the tourist enters <ok>.]

For the semantic web to function, computers must have access to structured collections of information and sets of inference rules that they can use to conduct automated reasoning. Knowledge representation, as this technology is often called, is clearly a good idea, and some very nice demonstrations exist, but it has not yet changed the world. It contains the seeds of important applications, but to realize its full potential it must be linked into a single global system. Traditional knowledge-representation systems typically have been centralized, requiring everyone to share exactly the same definition of common concepts, but central [control is stifling, and increasing the size and scope of such a system rapidly becomes unmanageable.]

[page 36]

Most of the Web's content today is designed for humans to read, not for computer programs to manipulate meaningfully. Computers can adeptly parse Web pages for layout and routine processing—here a header, there a link to another page—but in general, computers have no reliable way to process the semantics: this is the home page of the Hartman and Strauss Physio Clinic, this link goes to Dr. Hartman's curriculum vitae.

The Semantic Web will bring structure to the meaningful content of Web pages, creating an environment where software agents roaming from page to page can readily carry out sophisticated tasks for users. Such an agent coming to the clinic's Web page will know not just that the page has keywords such as "treatment, medicine, physical, therapy"

[page 37]

(as might be encoded today) but also that Dr. Hartman works at this clinic on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays and that the script takes a date range in yyyy-mm-dd format and returns appointment times.

[...]

Knowledge Representation

FOR THE SEMANTIC WEB to function, computers must have access to structured collections of information and sets of inference rules that they can use to conduct automated reasoning. Artificial-intelligence researchers have studied such systems since long before the Web was developed. Knowledge representation, as this technology is often called, is currently in a state comparable to that of hypertext before the advent of the Web: it is clearly a good idea, and some very nice demonstrations exist, but it has not yet changed the world. It contains the seeds of important applications, but to realize its full potential it must be linked into a single global system.

Traditional knowledge-representation systems typically have been centralized, requiring everyone to share exactly the same definition of common concepts

[page 38]

such as "parent" or "vehicle." But central control is stifling, and increasing the size and scope of such a system rapidly becomes unmanageable.

[...]

The challenge of the Semantic Web, therefore, is to provide a language that expresses both data and rules for reasoning about the data and that allows rules from any existing knowledge-representation system to be exported onto the Web.

Anmerkungen

The source is given on page 17, but it is not made clear that the text is so close to the source.

Sichter
(SleepyHollow02), Schumann, WiseWoman



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