Assessing the Impact of XML/EDI with Real Option Valuation

von Dr. Shermin Voshmgir

vorherige Seite | zur Übersichtsseite | folgende Seite

Statistik und Sichtungsnachweis dieser Seite findet sich am Artikelende

[1.] Svr/Fragment 057 01 - Diskussion
Zuletzt bearbeitet: 2020-05-21 21:33:40 [[Benutzer:|]]
BauernOpfer, Edwards 1999, Fragment, Gesichtet, SMWFragment, Schutzlevel sysop, Svr

Typus
BauernOpfer
Bearbeiter
SleepyHollow02
Gesichtet
Yes.png
Untersuchte Arbeit:
Seite: 57, Zeilen: 1-13, 15-32
Quelle: Edwards 1999
Seite(n): online, Zeilen: 0
[With its flat-rate fee structure, for instance, the Internet is substantially cheaper than the] value-added networks (VANs) traditionally used for EDI, which charge by the byte for each EDI message. Using traditional EDI, it costs about $2.50 to process a purchase order, compared to around $50 to process a paper-based version, according to Forrester Research, Cambridge, Mass. Internet-based EDI can lower the transaction cost still further, to less than $1.25 (Edwards 1999).

The Internet also makes EDI accessible to the companies previously shut out by the high start-up fees and complexity of implementing and maintaining the required systems. In large companies, these costs can be justified by the increase in efficiency and the additional revenues generated from trading partners. For smaller companies, though, the EDI costs may be prohibitive, so millions of firms are denied these revenue opportunities. With a Web-based EDI service, companies can now be part of the action for less than $1,000 a year, compared to the estimated cost of $50,000 to join a traditional EDI network.

[4.2.3 Hub and Spoke Relationship Improvement]

For the moment, though, rather than eliminating EDI, organizations are combining it with Internet transaction systems to make the service faster and more comprehensive, and to add new partner, supplier, and customer connections, especially with smaller firms. This is a win-win development, since the more partners and suppliers a company connects, the larger the savings and production efficiencies and, often, the greater the revenues.

Changes are also occurring in the traditional hub-spoke EDI business model, where the hub is the organization that initiates the transaction and the spoke the trading partner supplying products and services to the hub. Increasingly, organizations are adopting a dual-capacity role as both hubs and partners, creating an extended EDI model. The Internet takes this evolution a step further by adding extranets with the potential for connecting many more partners, suppliers, distributors, and customers.

According to market researcher International Data Corp. (IDC), dual-capacity hubpartners will account for the strongest growth in EDI transactions over the next few years, jumping from one-quarter of EDI service revenues in 1998 to two-thirds by 2003. IDC also predicts that the Internet will handle 41% of EDI transactions by 2003, up from 6% in 1998. It still sees a rosy future for EDI, projecting an 18.6% [compound annual growth rate in EDI service revenues to reach $2.3 billion by 2003, with the Internet portion accounting for 33% of the revenues (Edwards 1999).]

With its flat-rate fee structure, for instance, the Internet is substantially cheaper than the value-added networks (VANs) traditionally used for EDI, which charge by the byte for each EDI message. Using traditional EDI, it costs about $2.50 to process a purchase order, compared to around $50 to process a paper-based version, according to Forrester Research, Cambridge, Mass. Internet-based EDI can lower the transaction cost still further, to less than $1.25.

The Internet also makes EDI accessible to the companies previously shut out by the high start-up fees and complexity of implementing and maintaining the required systems. In large companies, these costs can be justified by the increase in efficiency and the additional revenues generated from trading partners.

For smaller companies, though, the EDI costs may be prohibitive, so millions of firms are denied these revenue opportunities. With a Web-based EDI service, companies can now be part of the action for less than $1,000 a year, compared to the estimated cost of $50,000 to join a traditional EDI network.

[...]

For the moment, though, rather than eliminating EDI, organizations are combining it with Internet transaction systems to make the service faster and more comprehensive, and to add new partner, supplier, and customer connections, especially with smaller firms. This is a win-win development, since the more partners and suppliers a company connects, the larger the savings and production efficiencies and, often, the greater the revenues.

Changes are also occurring in the traditional hub-spoke EDI business model, where the hub is the organization that initiates the transaction and the spoke the trading partner supplying products and services to the hub. Increasingly, organizations are adopting a dual-capacity role as both hubs and partners, creating an extended EDI model. The Internet takes this evolution a step further by adding extranets with the potential for connecting many more partners, suppliers, distributors, and customers.

According to market researcher International Data Corp. (IDC) of Framingham, Mass., dual-capacity hub/partners will account for the strongest growth in EDI transactions over the next few years, jumping from one-quarter of EDI service revenues in 1998 to two-thirds by 2003. IDC also predicts that the Internet will handle 41% of EDI transactions by 2003, up from 6% in 1998. It still sees a rosy future for EDI, projecting an 18.6% compound annual growth rate in EDI service revenues to reach $2.3 billion by 2003, with the Internet portion accounting for 33% of the revenues.

Anmerkungen

Although the source is given twice, there are no quotation marks.

Sichter
(SleepyHollow02) Schumann



vorherige Seite | zur Übersichtsseite | folgende Seite
Letzte Bearbeitung dieser Seite: durch Benutzer:Schumann, Zeitstempel: 20200206140906
Nutzung von Community-Inhalten gemäß CC-BY-SA, sofern nicht anders angegeben.
… weitere Daten zur Seite „Svr/057
SleepyHollow02 +
(SleepyHollow02) Schumann +